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Iris 'Savannah Sunset'

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Photo Courtesy of Walters Gardens, Inc.
 Common Name: Iris-Tall Bearded
  • Glowing, cadmium orange self with tangerine beards

  • Tall stems with 8-10 buds

  • Blooms for an exceptionally long period from late spring through early summer

No garden would be complete without Tall Bearded Irises. Though they have been grown for decades, new and improved hybrids continue to be developed every year and fabulous color combinations have been achieved. The Tall Beardeds bloom after the Dwarf Irises but before the Japanese and Siberian Irises. They are wonderful accent plants for late spring gardens.

Breeder: Schreiner

Origin: Not Native to North America

Characteristics:



Height:
  38 Inches
Spread:
  12-18 Inches
Flower Color:
  Gold/Orange Shades
Foliage Color:
  Green shades
Hardiness Zone:
3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10
Find Your Zone
Sun or Shade?:
  Full sun (> 6 hrs. direct sun)
  Part shade (4-6 hrs. direct sun)
Wet or dry?:
  Low water needs
  Average water needs
Need critter resistant plants?:
  Deer resistant
  Rabbit resistant
How fast should it grow?:
  Medium
When should it bloom?:
  Late spring
  Early summer
How's your soil?:
  Average Soil
Sweet or Sour Soil?:
  Neutral Soil (pH = 7.0)
  Alkaline Soil (pH > 7.0)
What's your garden style?:
  Woodland/Shade
  Cottage
  Water Garden
  Eclectic

Attributes:

Border plants
Cut flower or foliage
Dried flower or seed heads
Drought Tolerant
Mass Planting
Salt Tolerant
Specimen or focal point

Awards:

  American Iris Society Honorable Mention 2002

Homeowner Growing & Maintenance Tips:

Tall Bearded Irises will produce the most flowers if they receive a full day of sun, but will also perform reasonably well with a half day of sun. The most critical growing factor is the moisture level of the soil and drainage. Bearded Irises will absolutely not tolerate "wet feet" (too much water will cause the rhizomes to rot) and require very well-drained soil at all times of the year. They will grow in any good garden soil as long as this drainage is provided.

Irises are generally heavy feeders and should be fertilized 3 times per year: first in the spring when new growth appears, second right after blooming, and third in the fall. When planting them for the first time or when transplanting, use a no-nitrogen fertilizer such as 0-10-10 worked into the soil.

Division is recommended every 3-4 years to maintain healthy plants and achieve the maximum bloom. The best time of year to plant irises is in late summer after they are done blooming. Dig up the entire clump and use a sharp knife to cut apart the rhizomes. Keep only the newer ones around the outer edge of the clump and discard the old, woody center. Replant the new divisions 12-18 in. apart to allow ample room for new growth and good air circulation. Planting at the correct level is critical to the plant's health and flower production. Rhizomes should be planted so the soil barely covers the top of them, or 1-2 in. deep. Doing so will help to prevent soft rot.


Companions:

Common/Botanical Name
Zones  
Corydalis lutea
Common Name: Corydalis-Yellow
5,6,7
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Tanacetum 'Robinson's Mixture'
Common Name: Painted Daisy
3,4,5,6,7
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Geum coccineum 'Borisii'
Common Name: Avens
5,6,7
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Geranium sanguineum 'New Hampshire Purple'
Common Name: Geranium-Hardy
4,5,6,7,8
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Euphorbia polychroma
Common Name: Spurge-Cushion
4,5,6,7,8
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Papaver orientalis 'Beauty of Livermore'
Common Name: Poppy-Oriental
3,4,5,6,7
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Sedum 'Purple Emperor'
Common Name: Stonecrop-Autumn
3,4,5,6,7,8,9
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While every effort has been made to describe this plant accurately, please keep in mind that the height, bloom time, and color may differ in various climates throughout the country. The description of this plant was written based on our experience growing it in Michigan (USDA hardiness zone 5) and on numerous outside resources.