Back

Amsonia hubrichtii

Add To Wishlist
   
Photo Courtesy of Walters Gardens, Inc.
 Common Name: Blue Star-Arkansas
Common Name (Alternative): Arkansas Amsonia

This southern native has very narrow, needle-like leaves that line the stems like bottle brushes. Surprisingly, they are soft as silk to the touch. From late spring thru early summer, 2-3 inch wide clusters of small, light blue, star-shaped flowers are borne above the short mound of ferny foliage. After blooming, it quickly grows to reach a height of about 3 feet.

Amsonia adds a billowy, finely textured element to the landscape. It grows into a dense mass, much like a small shrub. The cool blue flowers can be useful in toning down adjacent flower colors.

The most valuable feature of amsonia is its fall color; the entire plant turns a stunning shade of golden yellow. It makes an excellent backdrop for fall-blooming perennials such as sedums and garden mums.

Origin: Native Species

Characteristics:



Height:
  3 Feet
Spread:
  3 Feet
Flower Color:
  Blue shades
Foliage Color:
  Green shades
Hardiness Zone:
4,5,6,7,8,9
Find Your Zone
Sun or Shade?:
  Full sun (> 6 hrs. direct sun)
  Part shade (4-6 hrs. direct sun)
Wet or dry?:
  Average water needs
  Consistent water needs
Need critter resistant plants?:
  Deer resistant
How fast should it grow?:
  Rapid
When should it bloom?:
  Late spring
  Early summer
Looking for seasonal interest?:
  Fall Color
How's your soil?:
  Poor Soil
  Average Soil
Sweet or Sour Soil?:
  Neutral Soil (pH = 7.0)
What's your garden style?:
  Rain Garden
  Water Garden
  Eclectic

Attributes:

Border plants
Cut flower or foliage
Mass Planting
Specimen or focal point
Easy to grow

Awards:

  Missouri Botanical Garden Emeritus Plants of Merit

Homeowner Growing & Maintenance Tips:

Amsonia thrives in most gardens with little care. It is low-maintenance, easy to grow and trouble-free. Plant it in full sun or partial shade and moist soil of average fertility. If grown in too much shade or very rich soil, its habit will be open and floppy. This plant grows fairly large but it will not need to be divided for many years. Cutting the stems back to within 6-8" of the ground after flowering will result in fuller growth.

Amsonia hubrichtii is native to fields and meadows in the midwest.  It can be found growing naturally in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri.


Companions:

Common/Botanical Name
Zones  
Caryopteris 'First Choice' PP11958 CPBRAF
Common Name: Blue Mist Shrub
6,7,8,9
Add To Wishlist
Sedum 'Purple Emperor'
Common Name: Stonecrop-Autumn
3,4,5,6,7,8,9
Add To Wishlist
Heuchera 'Obsidian' PP14836 COPF
Common Name: Coral Bells
4,5,6,7,8,9
Add To Wishlist
Ceratostigma plumbaginoides
Common Name: Plumbago
5,6,7,8,9
Add To Wishlist
Hosta 'Fortunei Aureomarginata'
Common Name: Hosta
3,4,5,6,7,8,9
Add To Wishlist
Chrysanthemum 'Bolero'
Common Name: Mum-Hardy Garden
5,6,7,8,9
Add To Wishlist
Aster novae-angliae 'Purple Dome'
Common Name: Aster-New England
3,4,5,6,7,8
Add To Wishlist
Iris 'Stairway to Heaven'
Common Name: Iris-Tall Bearded
3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10
Add To Wishlist
Dryopteris erythrosora 'Brilliance'
Common Name: Fern-Brilliance Autumn
5,6,7,8,9
Add To Wishlist
Hibiscus 'Jazzberry Jam' CPBR4255
Common Name: Rose Mallow
4,5,6,7,8,9
Add To Wishlist

While every effort has been made to describe this plant accurately, please keep in mind that the height, bloom time, and color may differ in various climates throughout the country. The description of this plant was written based on our experience growing it in Michigan (USDA hardiness zone 5) and on numerous outside resources.